NJIT Researcher to Receive Top NJIT $10,000 Prize– Overseers Award-for Nano Invention

WHAT: NJIT researchers discovered how to make nanoscale arrays of the world’s smallest probe for investigating the electrical properties of individual living, cells. For this work, the lead scientist, NJIT Research Professor Reginald C. Farrow, an expert in biophysics and materials science, is to receive the NJIT Board of Overseers Excellence in Research Prize and Medal. Larger electrical probes have been extremely important in understanding these properties, as indicated by the Nobel Prizes awarded to the inventors of two previous generations of probes. T the o nationally acclaimed expert in biophysics and materials science.

WHO: NJIT Research Professor Reginald C. Farrow

WHEN: Oct. 4, 2012, Eberhardt Hall at NJIT, at 5:30 p.m. To interview Farrow or attend the ceremony, contact Sheryl Weinstein, Sheryl.m.weinstein@njit.ed, 973-596-3436.

WHY: Farrow’s probe uses carbon nanotubes that are a hundred times smaller and offers the advantage of allowing small parts of a cell to be singled out for study with multiple probes. Furthermore, the larger probes restrict cell functions while the new nanoprobe does not. Besides increasing basic knowledge of cell physiology, this probe has practical applications such as determining the healthy dose of drugs, since the distribution of electrical charges in a healthy cell changes markedly when it becomes sick.

QUOTE: “Imagine electrical circuits that have billions of highly efficient micron-sized batteries powering individual components,” Farrow says. “We’ve created new engineering that can scale down the AA batteries in a television remote to the nanoscale. But it’s engineering we can use to create power sources on a larger scale as well, devices that are much lighter and contain less toxic material than the typical battery.” It’s engineering that could also lead to minimally invasive physiological monitoring, targeted drug delivery, brain and spinal stimulation, and other medical applications using nanoscale devices powered by the body’s own glucose and oxygen
NJIT, New Jersey’s science and technology university, enrolls more than 9,558 students pursuing bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in 120 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report’s 2011 Annual Guide to America’s Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Division of Continuing Professional Education.

Contact: Sheryl Weinstein, director, public relations, Sheryl.m.weinstein@njit.edu, 973-596-3436.

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