Dark Fiber: Enabling 10G Networks

By Illissa Miller

The secret behind the power of a 100G network is as simple as dark fiber. Before there is light, the fiber optic cable in its most raw form must be manufactured, constructed and spliced to enable it to be lit. Dark Fiber, in its true essence, is technology-neutral. This means that whether you want 10G, 40G or 100G worth of bandwidth out of your fiber strands, it is your choice—you simply need to choose the right hardware manufacturer to enable it.

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Author:NJ Tech Council

The New Jersey Tech Council helps companies grow and supports the tech, innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystems in the state and region.

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